kernel.org abbreviated is k.o.

Not that I dislike it. I mean, I always thought that the release process was just a crazy mix of different flavours of madness. Especially with the stable repo, containing “facepalm”-like fixes (hey, this is software engineering, not rocket science — but still!).

After a full month, git.kernel.org (both http and git ports), http://www.kernel.org, are still down, and I’m starting to get really bored. Linus temporarily (permanently?) moved his git repo to github.com in order to keep 3.1 development going and this seems to have worked for a good cut of consumers. But how about the other 100+ repos that were sitting on git.kernel.org? They’re not even accessible in read-only.

Being the Linux Kernel a vital part of the whole Linux-based FLOSS world, how can we accept a 1-month downtime? Why isn’t there anybody out there starting to raise the voice? That is completely ridiculous. While I understand the QA and Security teams involved in bisecting the kernel.org logs etc, I cannot really accept that git.kernel.org is still down, for the following reasons:

  • git repositories themselves haven’t been harmed (as they said — not my own words), so git.k.o could be restored at least to a read-only state without being much scared
  • ssh keys could be revoked for everybody and their access limited to git pushing

Can’t wait to ditch my frustration seeing kernel.org back to life.

About lxnay

the creator of Sabayon Linux, Entropy Package Manager {Eit, Equo, Rigo}, Molecule release media buildsystem, Matter Portage buildbot/tinderbox and only God knows what else...

6 responses to “kernel.org abbreviated is k.o.

  1. Duncan

    See the LWN update here:

    http://lwn.net/Articles/460376/rss

    They’re bringing the git accounts back online with gitolite instead of the former direct ssh remote shell access. One of the oft repeated criticisms of the previous arrangement was that IIRC some 200+ users had shell access, not exactly the most secure setup in the world, for sure, and part of the delay, as we see now, is in setting up rather stronger security policies, including seriously limiting the shell access to only the relative handful of real admins, not “everyone with a git repo”.

    Meanwhile, Linus switch to github is definitely temporary. That is in fact one of the reasons they’re delaying kernel 3.1 a bit, as Linus doesn’t want to handle the post 3.1 release 3.2 merge-window thru github. See the 3.1-rc7 announcement:

    http://lwn.net/Articles/459956/

    Duncan

    • Nice, I haven’t had the chance to read LWN 460376 (it has been published a few hours ago, while I was sleeping and the blog post already written).

      Whatever they’re going to do now, this is not good press at all…­čśŽ

  2. lol! look like the rolling release model used by sabayon linux distro is going mainstream! dump to bin all past versions and live dangerous ringht on the git head! and is working!

  3. aos

    actually they’re not as good as who they pretend to be. 1 month is indeed ridiculous, switching infrastructure or not, and these guys have a lot of resources (incl. financial)

    I’m thinking 2 weeks were spent choosing what to do and the total 4 spent trying to figure out if git has been compromised or not, and if so how to fix it (publicly, or not)

    Also anyone who didnt copy his private key on the host, did not get his ssh key compromised, yet, they first required everyone to generate a new one. I mean, if anything, that shows the level of the guys security wise. And I’m not surprised.

  4. John M. Drescher

    I got here last night from the gentoo main page because I was getting very frustrated in the downtime. I was going to post about that. However kernel.org is up now.­čÖé

  5. udo

    this is really sad. I tried downloading a patch for my kernel but the links seem to give me 404 errors. Even all the mirror site turned out the same…. Please Could anyone help with any temporary site to download Linux kernels and patch… This is getting really frustrating.

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